From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; February 26, 2014:

Cave Inn Ryan Deboodt, National Geographic Your Shot

"After two days of trekking and caving, we reached the first camp inside Hang Son Doong [Mountain River Cave], the world’s largest cave,” writes Your Shot contributor Ryan Deboodt. “The entire way, I was in awe of the scene unfolding in front of me. The atmosphere created by the clouds entering the cave from the first doline (opening in the cave ceiling) was surreal. I couldn’t get over the fact that we would be camping at this most unique location and wanted to capture the feeling of having this at your doorstep.”

The 2.5-mile cave is located in Vietnam's Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park, near the border with Laos.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.

#travel #adventure

buzzfeed:

Everything would’ve been fine if Walter White had just hung out and told some really bad chemistry jokes.

mobipedia: Smarter than Einstein

mobipedia:

There is a story about how Albert Einstein was travelling to universities, giving lectures on his famous theory of relativity. One day while on their way to a university,

The driver said:” Dr. Einstein, I’ve heard that lecture more than 30 times. I have learned it by heart and bet I could…

discoverynews:

Mystery Alignment of ‘Butterfly’ Nebulae Discovered

Astronomers have discovered something weird in the Milky Way’s galactic bulge — a population of planetary nebula are all mysteriously pointing in the same direction. Read more

priceofliberty:

New coating turns ordinary glass into super glass

A new transparent, bioinspired coating makes ordinary glass tough, self-cleaning and incredibly slippery, a team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) reported online in the July 31 edition of Nature Communications.

The new could be used to create durable, scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses, self-cleaning windows, improved and new medical diagnostic devices, said principal investigator Joanna Aizenberg, Ph.D., who is a Core Faculty Member at the Wyss Institute, Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science at SEAS, and a Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology.

The new coating builds on an award-winning technology that Aizenberg and her team pioneered called Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces (SLIPS)—the slipperiest synthetic surface known. The new coating is equally slippery, but much more durable and fully transparent. Together these advances solve longstanding challenges in creating commercially useful materials that repel almost everything.

SLIPS was inspired by the slick strategy of the carnivorous , which lures insects onto the ultraslippery surface of its leaves, where they slide to their doom. Unlike earlier water-repelling materials, SLIPS repels oil and sticky liquids like honey, and it resists ice formation and as well.

While SLIPS was an important advance, it was also “a proof of principle” – the first step toward a commercially valuable technology, said lead author Nicolas Vogel, Ph.D., a in applied physics at Harvard SEAS.

the honeycomb structure of the SLIPS coating on the glass slides confers unmatched mechanical robustness. It withstood damage and remained slippery after various treatments that can scratch and compromise ordinary glass surfaces and other popular liquid-repellent materials, including touching, peeling off a piece of tape, wiping with a tissue.

laboratoryequipment:

Skydiver Survives 24 Mile Drop

Felix Baumgartner stood alone at the edge of space, poised in the open doorway of a capsule suspended above Earth and wondering if he would make it back alive. Twenty four miles below him, millions of people were right there with him, watching on the Internet and marveling at the wonder of the moment.

A second later, he stepped off the capsule and barreled toward the New Mexico desert as a tiny white speck against a darkly-tinted sky. Millions watched him breathlessly as he shattered the sound barrier and then landed safely about nine minutes later, becoming the world’s first supersonic skydiver.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/skydiver-survives-24-mile-drop

Amazing, would love if I tried it.